La vida és breu i el desig infinit (A TOT VENT-RÚST) (Catalan Edition)

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Foix , probably the most enduring of modern Catalan poets,and one whose work continues to present a formidable challenge to hisreaders. That year, appropriately, saw the establishment of theFundaci J. Foix, and the centenary was further celebrated withvarious exhibitions, readings and other activities related to his work.

One of these was Descobrir la poesia 'Discovering Poetry' -theperformance of a selection of Foix's poems in a stage version by CarmeSansa and other actors. The texts used for that occasion were chosen byCarme Sobrevila and Ferran Bach, and this book is effectively the firstedition of the small anthology they prepared. The title chosen for thisAnglo-Catalan Society Occasional Publication refers back, then, to theoriginal circumstances of Descobrir la poesia and, at the same time,characterises the other texts that here accompany the poetry.

As an echo of the anniversary celebrations, the Anglo-CatalanSociety devoted its annual conference in November that year to aseries of lectures on Foix's work, and it is these -two of which havebeen translated from Catalan- which form the second part of thisvolume. The delay in publication is due to various circumstantialfactors, which we are glad finally to have overcome. My own paper, which comes first only because it is in the nature ofa general introduction, attempts to explain Foix's poetics in terms of acosmic vision which affects the smallest details of his poems andaccounts for the constant presence of metamorphoses.

ManuelCarbonell examines with great subtlety the relations betweenmodernity and tradition in Foix's work, stressing the importance of the'Instant' in which time is made eternal, and which frees us fromhistorical contingency. Marie-Claire Zimmermann concentrates on asingle collection, Sol, i de dol, and shows in impressive detail how thevoice of the speaker is deliberately constructed as independent fromthe author: 'In Sol, i de dol the voice gradually constructs its solitudeand its place in the world.

It invents all kinds of interlocutors: things,woman, friends, God. Foixthe material energy of the world in a reduced, poematic space. These 'readings' of J. Foix, though they by no means exhaust theimplications of such a complex body of poetry, clearly point the readerin the right direction and, taken together, raise a number of importantissues which had previously been neglected.

Similarly with theanthology.

Adhering strictly to the contents of the Descobrir la poesiaselection was taken up as a challenge in translation: the operationcertainly produced some interesting and satisfying results that wouldnot have emerged if we had succumbed to the temptation to modify theoriginal anthology. Although only a much larger selection could betruly representative, this relatively small group of poems, arranged bythemes, covers practically the whole of Foix's writing career andhighlights many of his characteristic strengths: the mercurialimagination which constantly creates new and surprising images, theunique verbal texture, the ability to work equally successfully in therelative freedom of the prose poem and in the strict metres of thesonnet and the ballad, and above all the absolute assurance with whichhe moves between a vast cosmic vision and the minutest detail.

Foix,clearly, is a master of language: his vocabulary, for instance, is easilythe largest of any modern Catalan poet.

Under the following conditions:

Even when the translatorconfines himself to so-called 'literal' translations the basic policyfollowed for this collection considerable and very particulardifficulties are posed by Foix's writing, the limits being reached in thetantalizing 'Poem for Antoni Tpies'. Each of my fellow translators -Dominic Keown, John London and Alan Yates - has faced up to thesedifficulties with enormous care, and the results, I think, are as faithfulas it is possible to be. Nevertheless, as should be obvious, our versionsare mostly intended as a help to the reader who is prepared to engagewith the originals, for which of course there is no substitute.

Jordi Fernando and Isabel Deniel in the Direcci de ServeisEditorials have provided sympathetic help and invaluable expertiseduring the production process. The interest ofJordi Madern in our collaboration has been particularly appreciated. Helen Oppenheimer and Manuel Carbonell have helped with fine-tuning of some details of translation, and Spencer Groves cooperatedin translating the other texts.

Puri Gmez i Casademont has coordinated the publication process,from inception to completion, with dedication and efficiency. Thiscollaboration was possible thanks to her tenure of a "Generalitat deCatalunya" Graduate Tutorship in the Department of Hispanic Studiesat Sheffield University and subsequent tenure ofa Batista i Roca research bursary. Jaume Vallcorba for encouragementand permission to reproduce the poetic texts from the Quaderns Cremacopyright edition. Where fragments of longer works have been used,line numbering of the Quaderns Crema edition has been retained. Landscapes and seascapesPepa, la lletera Gertrudis, 'Aquest mat ha vingut una dona, On he deixat les.

ErosNo m'omplis ms de flors: ja no t'estimo Darrer comunicat, 'Sota les voltes diu Marta que es mulla; DedicationsDiem: la nit!

Amb les condicions segents:

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Language is above all a movement, a tension,. Sobre nosaltres. Suggest Documents Although only a much larger selection could betruly representative, this relatively small group of poems, arranged bythemes, covers practically the whole of Foix's writing career andhighlights many of his characteristic strengths: the mercurialimagination which constantly creates new and surprising images, theunique verbal texture, the ability to work equally successfully in therelative freedom of the prose poem and in the strict metres of thesonnet and the ballad, and above all the absolute assurance with whichhe moves between a vast cosmic vision and the minutest detail.

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Perfect location Stayed in June Good location , Near to Train station, some good cafes nearby also , reception satff nice Stayed in June Location Stayed in June The General Act of the Berlin Conference dated 26 February , which introduced the principle of effective occupation, was potentially damaging to Portuguese claims, particularly in Mozambique where other powers were active. Article 34 required a nation acquiring land on the coasts of Africa outside of its previous possessions to notify the other signatories of the Act so they could protest against such claims.

Article 35 of the Act provided that rights could only be acquired over previously uncolonised lands if the power claiming them had established sufficient authority there to protect existing rights and the freedom of trade. This normally implied making treaties with local rulers, establishing an administration and exercising police powers.

Initially, Portugal claimed that the Berlin Treaty did not apply, and it was not required to issue notifications or establish effective occupation, as Portugal's claim to the Mozambique coast had existed for centuries and had been unchallenged.

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To forestall British designs on the parts of Mozambique and the interior that O'Neill claimed Portugal did not occupy, Joaquim Carlos Paiva de Andrada was commissioned in to establish effective occupation, and he was active in four areas. Firstly, in he established the town of Beira and Portuguese occupation of much of Sofala Province. Secondly, also in , he acquired a concession of an area within a kilometre radius of Zumbo, which had been reoccupied and west of which Afro-Portuguese families had traded and settled since the s.

Although Andrada did not establish any administration immediately, in an outpost was established beyond the junction of the Zambezi and Kafue River and an administrative district was established based on Zumbo. Andrada succeeded in obtaining treaties over much of this area and establishing a rudimentary administration but he was arrested in November by British South Africa Company troops and expelled.

Finally, also in , Andrada crossed northern Mashonaland, approximately the area of the Mashonaland Central Province of Zimbabwe , to obtain treaties. He failed to inform the Portuguese government of these treaties, so these claims were not formally notified to other powers, as required by the Berlin Treaty.


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  6. Despite the outcome of the Berlin Conference and the failure of bi-lateral negotiations with Britain, Portugal did not abandon the idea of securing a trans-African colonial zone. In , the Portuguese Foreign Minister, Barros Gomes, published what became known as the Pink or Rose-Coloured Map, which represented a formal Portuguese claim to sovereignty over an area defined by the map that stretched from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. To obtain the French treaty, Portugal agreed to give up any claim to the area around the Casamance River in Guinea in exchange for a vague recognition of its rights to exercise sovereignty in an undefined area between Angola and Mozambique, although the Rose-Coloured Map was attached to the treaty for information.

    To obtain the treaty with Germany noting Portugal's claim to territory along the course of the Zambezi linking Angola and Mozambique and with the Rose-Coloured Map attached, Portugal agreed to accept a southern boundary for Angola and a northern boundary for Mozambique that were favourable to Germany. The acts of "noting" the Portuguese claims and attaching the Rose-Coloured Map to each treaty did not amount to France or Germany accepting the claims, only that Portugal had made them.

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    Lord Salisbury formally protested against the Rose-Coloured Map, but initially made no British claim to any of the territories it concerned. Further, in July , Salisbury stated that the British government would not accept any Portuguese claim to an area unless there were sufficient Portuguese forces to maintain order.

    The Portuguese government therefore considered that this meant that Britain would accept a claim backed by effective occupation. This was rejected by Portugal because the Shire Highlands and their missions could at that time only be accessed through coastal areas acknowledged as Portuguese, and because the proposal would involve giving up the southern and more valuable half of the transcontinental zone claimed the Rose-Coloured Map, apparently for little in return. By the Portuguese government felt less confident and its Foreign Minister , Barros Gomes, proposed to the British government that it was willing to abandon its claim to a zone linking Angola and Mozambique in exchange for recognition of its claim to the Shire Highlands.

    This time, it was the British government that rejected the proposal, firstly because of the strong opposition of those supporting the Scottish missions, and secondly, because the Chinde River entrance to the Zambezi had been discovered in April As the Zambezi could now be directly entered by ocean-going ships, it and its tributary the Shire River could be regarded as an international waterway giving access to the Shire Highlands.

    The Cape to Cairo idea was first put forward by Henry Hamilton Johnston in a newspaper article in August three years after the map was published, and only later take over by Rhodes.